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Drop Dead at 100

Drop Dead at 100 The Stone Clinic
Drop dead in your 100s, playing some sport. This is our goal for our patients. If they can stay fit, recover from illness and injury, and keep their eye on the ball; dropping dead in action at 100+ is a great goal. Here is how to get there and how not to:

Military Knees

Military Knees
Standardized care is not always the best care. What we really need is an agile medical system that values innovation.

The CMI: What it Means to All of Us

The CMI: What it Means to All of Us
The re-introduction of the collagen meniscus implant (CMI), unavailable in the U.S. for more than five years, will mean an improved quality of life for thousands of Americans.

Regrowing your knee

Collegen Meniscus Implant
How a biological device can act as a trellis for new meniscus tissue to grow into, reconstructing missing segments of the meniscus shape.

The degradative soup of injury and arthritis

Arthritis may in fact be preventable if we are able to stop the production of the enzymes early after injury
New studies have shown that when a meniscus tissue is torn, pro-arthritis enzymes and factors are released, which stimulate the synovial lining cells of the joint to go into overdrive.

Cartilage Repair: Is it possible? Update from the Orthopedic Research Society symposium

Orthopedic Research Society Dr. Kevin Stone
As a part of this year’s ORS meeting, Dr. Kevin R. Stone was honored to join Dr. Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic as an invited speaker in a special translational research symposium session entitled “Cartilage Repair: Is it possible?

Why surgically fix a torn meniscus?

Fix a meniscus to avoid arthritis
A recent study suggested that meniscus surgery doesn't help. Studies can be misleading. Even small losses of meniscus tissue lead to big changes in force concentration on the tibia (shin bone) and eventually arthritis.

Why fix or replace a meniscus?

Why fix or replace a meniscus?
Losing a meniscus is tough on the body. Without a meniscus, the covering of each of the bones, called the articular cartilage, rub up against one another, which leads to pain and, eventually arthritis. Patients often ask me "Isn't there a shock absorber you can put back into the knee joint?"
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