ACL Reconstruction Surgery for Soccer Player & Rock Climber

I was a student athlete at Chico State. And I just graduated from college last year and last spring in a soccer game. I was tackled and heard a snap and a pop fell to the ground. I've been an athlete. My whole life. I've been playing soccer since I was seven super avid rock climber outdoors. And I was hoping my career to go into like outdoor guiding or backpacking. I basically was living with a torn ACL for a year without knowing it. I actually found Dr. Stone through a professional climber that I follow Alex Puccio. So I was excited because I found someone in California that I could go and see. And so I did the free consultation over the phone with Dr. Stone. He saw my MRI and basically said that I had a ruptured ACL this entire time. And I needed to get it taken care of, especially if I wanted to return to full athletics, basically went into surgery.

Three months ago today, I just passed my first sports test with 101%. And I'm stronger than I was prior to surgery. And the pain is basically gone. And when I would walk down Hills in San Francisco or walk downstairs, my knee cap would physically slide forward and it was extremely painful and I had no stability in my knee at all. And now I'm hiking and like walking downstairs, no problem. There's no pain. This is like my first, really big injury and big surgery. And it was really anxiety-filled and really nerve-wracking to go into such a big thing. But I think with the team here, the PT team and just the kindness that I've received here, it's been a really exciting process. So I'm excited to get back to climbing and soccer, and I know that it's possible. And so, yeah, that's where I'm at.

I'm now six months from my ACL and PLC reconstructive surgery. I had two ligaments reconstructed by Dr. Stone in March. And between three and six months was go time. Goal is to get back to like longer distance running and trail running. And I did my first trail run in the Redwoods on Sunday. And that was about at the six-month mark that's this week. And so that was in the Redwoods, two miles. That was amazing. And I had zero inflammation, zero pain, even going downhill a little bit my knee was so solid. It wasn't catching or sliding forward. Like it used to when I'd walk the hills of San Francisco. I've been climbing outdoors again, I been surfing and running. Like I mentioned biking, it's so important. And I know The Stone Clinic believes in this too, to continue use your body, to get the blood flowing, to keep, to stay in shape, to still burn calories, to still have a great diet and still be an athlete. I got to climb at sunset looking over the beach and it was zero pain. It was amazing. And I just danced right up the route and was so excited to have my hands like chopped up again. So it was an amazing experience with friends and back into my adventurous lifestyle.
 

Testimonial
I did my first trail run in the Redwoods on Sunday, two miles. That was amazing. And I had zero inflammation, zero pain, even going downhill a little bit my knee was so solid. I've been climbing outdoors again, I been surfing and running. I got to climb at sunset looking over the beach and it was zero pain. It was amazing. And I just danced right up the route.
- Olivia V.

Unfortunately, when injured, the ACL usually becomes completely dysfunctional and requires replacement or reconstruction. Surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is indicated for patients with unstable knees who desire to remain active. We reconstruct the ligament with a sterilized donor bone-patellar tendon-bone graft. When followed with an intense, rehabilitation program that is individually-designed for each patient, more than 90% of our patients are able to return to full sports with a stable knee.  We have a successful track record with professional athletes and weekend warriors with this specific reconstruction technique.

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