You are here

How do biologic treatments work?

Biologic treatments stimulate natural tissue healing, working to enhance the body’s own repair process.

At the initial injury, the rupture of the tissue causes fluid to be released from the injured cells surrounding blood vessels.  The body responds by sending new blood vessels and cells, which at first specialize in removing the damaged tissue and later stimulate new collagen formation to repair and replace the damaged tissue.  Over time, other signals, chemicals and cells induce a maturation process to turn the immature healing tissue into mature strong replacement tissue.

Biologic treatments can augment and accelerate this process. The physician can help your body respond faster to the injury by providing a range of treatments from a massage to stimulate the receptors on cells to release healing factors, to an injection of growth factors, to the surgical implantation of collagen scaffolds. Surgeons can also use human allograft donor tissue to entirely replace damaged tissue, even using animal device tissues called xenografts.  During the healing process additional treatments can speed up the maturation of the healing tissues and induce a stronger repair than might otherwise occur.

A wide range of biologic therapies are available today and more arriving each month.

knee-popping-knee-clicking-knee-noise
A question I am asked a lot is, “I hear clicking and popping in my knee, is this something that I should be concerned about?”
Arthritis is preventable. Yet until recently most people thought it was inevitable. Here are some examples of how to best treat your injured knee.
Standardized care is not always the best care. What we really need is an agile medical system that values innovation.
July 14th, 2015
In light of Wes Matthews and other NBA athletes suffering Achilles ruptures, Dr. Stone speaks to Mavs Moneyball, a...
April 27th, 2016
Dr Stone talking about Steph Curry's injury and the Warrior's season.
December 11th, 2014
"A few select orthopedic surgeons and researchers around the country are pioneering alternate cartilage...

Kevin R. Stone · Jonathan R. Pelsis · Scott T. Surrette · Ann W. Walgenbach · Thomas J. Turek 

Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) is blood plasma that has been enriched with platelets.

Stone, K.R., A.W. Walgenbach, T.J. Turek, A. Freyer, and M.D. Hill. 2006.